Halloween Safety in Terrace

How to celebrate safely during the pandemic

Halloween is going to look a little different this year, but it can still be safe and fun for everyone. Explore the resources below to learn:

  • When can I set off fireworks?
  • How can I safely distribute candy for trick-or-treaters?
  • How can I make trick-or-treating safe for my family?
  • How can I keep my pets safe on Halloween?
  • And more!
Safety Overview

Spooky season is upon us—but it will probably look different this year for many people. As you prepare for Halloween, keep these tips from the BC Centre for Disease Control in mind!

Parties:

  1. Leave the parties behind. Indoor gatherings of any size put people at higher risk of getting COVID-19. Instead, watch a favourite spooky movie or play a game with your household or small social group.
  2. Don’t pass around snacks, drinks, or smokes of any kind.
  3. Try to be outside more than inside, and keep indoor spaces well ventilated.

Trick-or-Treating:

  1. Respect homes by staying away if the lights are out.
  2. Stick to your local neighbourhood this year, and trick-or-treat in a small group.
  3. Wash hands before you go out, when you get home, and before eating treats—but don’t worry about cleaning every treat. Instead, wash your hands after handling treats and don’t touch your face.

Handing out Treats:

  1. Find creative ways to distribute treats—like a candy slide down your steps—or use simple tools like tongs or a baking sheet to give treats to trick-or-treaters.
  2. Wear a non-medical mask that covers your nose and mouth when handing out treats.
  3. Make trick-or-treating more accessible by standing outside your door, at the curbside, or at the bottom of your stairs to hand out treats without kids needing to touch the door or doorknob. Or, be sure to regularly clean and disinfect doorknobs and doorbells, and any other high-touch surfaces, throughout the evening.

Remember: if you are sick, self-isolating, or choosing not to participate, turn off your porch light and stay at home to let visitors know to skip your house this year.

Find these tips and more on the BC CDC website.

Fireworks Safety

Happy Halloween! From October 24 to November 1 each year, anyone over 19 years old may set off fireworks in Terrace on private property with written permission from the owner. Public events must receive permission from the Fire Department. Non-compliance can result in a $100 fine.

Do you know how to be responsible and safe when using fireworks? Scroll down to view some top tips from the Terrace Fire Department.

 

Learn more about fireworks regulations in our bylaws

City of Terrace Fire Prevention Bylaw No. 1365-1994 (Consolidated)

City of Terrace Nuisance Bylaw No. 1318

City of Terrace Noise Control Bylaw No. 2100-2016

 

Need something shareable? Read our brochure for details.

Download Fireworks & the Law brochure

 

Costume Safety

Are your kids’ costumes ready for Halloween? Here are a few tips from the Canadian Paediatric Society and the BC CDC to make those spooky, silly, and creative outfits safer for trick-or-treating:

  • Try including a non-medical mask or face covering as part of a costume.
  • Do not wear costume masks over non-medical masks as they may make it difficult to breathe.
  • Costumes should fit properly to prevent tripping hazards.
  • Make or buy costumes in light-coloured material to improve visibility, and include reflective tape on the front and back for driver awareness.
  • Dress your child for the weather, adding layers if necessary.
Green Halloween

Halloween can be green! The Recycling Council of BC has great suggestions for making Halloween a little more environmentally friendly.

Try homemade décor.
Instead of buying decorations each year, reuse what you have or make your own using easy-to-recycle material like cardboard boxes, construction paper, or even branches from your yard.

Skip plastic treat buckets and bags.
Or at least reuse them every year! An old pillow case or reusable shopping bag is even better. Decorate with stencils, googly eyes, or fabric cut-outs to ramp up the spookiness.

Make your own face paint.
While you may be considering including a non-medical face mask in your kids' costumes, other types of traditional Halloween masks can reduce visibility. However, chemical-laden face paint isn’t great either—so why not make your own? Mix equal parts cornstarch and glycerin (check the grocery store) and add food colouring. Fake blood is also an easy thing to make, so try some of these recipes for your costumes and house decorations.

Reuse that costume.
Donate your old costumes to a second-hand store (be sure to wash first if possible) or pass them along to friends or family. A costume swap, when safe to do so, can also be a fun way to find something new.

Trick-or-treat close to home.
This year, more than ever, stick to your own neighbourhood if it’s a safe, well-lit area with sidewalks, rather than driving to a different area to trick-or-treat.

Find more tips from the Recycling Council of BC here and here.

Pet Safety

Above, we looked at fireworks safety for humans—but what about pets? The sudden noise from fireworks can be very upsetting to animals. Please be considerate of your neighbours regarding your fireworks usage and let them know in advance if you’re planning to set any off. Be sure to clean up afterwards as fireworks debris can be harmful to animals.

For pet owners, here are some tips from PetMD. First, be sure to keep your pets inside on Halloween in a secure, familiar place. If you’re expecting trick-or-treaters, keep your pets confined somewhere away from the door as constant strangers on or near the doorstep can be stressful and scary for your furry friends, and may even result in escape attempts or unexpected aggression.

Make sure your pets are wearing their collar and ID with the correct, up-to-date information in case of an unexpected escape. For pets with microchips, this is a great time to check that the company supporting your pet’s microchip has your up-to-date contact information.

Keep Halloween candy (especially chocolate and treats containing xylitol), pumpkins (especially when lit), and glow sticks away from pets.

Want to dress up your pet? Ensure he or she doesn’t suffer from restricted movement, hearing, eyesight, or breathing in the costume, and supervise your pet at all times so if something goes wrong, you can address it immediately. Above all, be sure your pet is happy to wear the costume—and not annoyed or scared by it.

Find more tips from PetMD. 

Trick-or-Treating Tips

Here are some tips from the Canadian Paediatric Society and BC Centre for Disease Control for making trick-or-treating fun and safe for the kids in your life.

All trick-or-treaters should stay away from homes if the lights are out. While they might be of the house, they might also be under self-isolation or choosing not to participate this year. Ensure kids respect these choices.

Kids should also be aware not to enter a stranger’s house. Remind them to go up one side of the street and down the other—no criss-crossing from one side to the other. Stick to sidewalks when available.

Not sure if you need to go with your children? Kids under 10 should be accompanied by an adult. By the age of 10, some kids will be ready to go with a group of friends.

Ensure children going without adults are in a group of at least three people, but no more than six. Discuss their route in advance and their curfew. Ensure they have a flashlight and a cell phone, if available.

Trick-or-treaters should wash their hands before they go out, when they get home, and before eating treats—but don’t worry about cleaning every treat. Instead, tell kids to wash their hands after handling treats and not to touch their face. While trick-or-treating, bring along hand santizier in case they do inevitably want to unwrap a treat. Ensure they know not to litter. For children with allergies, it may be best not to eat anything until they get home.

Speaking of allergies, ensure kids with allergies that need an EpiPen bring theirs along and let their friends know what to do if they need it. Ensure children tell the person giving out treats that they have an allergy. They can also look for teal-coloured pumpkins or posters that indicate there are allergen-free treats available (ie: not food). Read more tips from Food Allergy Canada.

Find more trick-or-treating tips from the Canadian Paediatric Society here.

Handing Out Treats

Trick or treat! If you’ll be handing out treats for trick-or-treaters this year, you can make it safer by following some guidelines from the BC Centre for Disease Control:

-Find creative ways to distribute treats—like a candy slide down your steps—or use simple tools like tongs or a baking sheet to give treats to trick-or-treaters.

-Wear a non-medical mask that covers your nose and mouth when handing out treats.

-Make trick-or-treating more accessible by standing outside your door, at the curbside, or at the bottom of your stairs to hand out treats without kids needing to touch the door or doorknob. Or, be sure to regularly clean and disinfect doorknobs and doorbells, and any other high-touch surfaces, throughout the evening.

-If you are decorating, avoid props that can cause coughing, such as smoke machines.  

-Ensure outdoor lights are on and working, walkways are free of leaves, and any tripping hazards are removed.

-As noted above, having non-food treats like stickers or colouring books is a great alternative for kids with allergies. If you have these types of treats to give out, put a teal pumpkin on your doorstep or a picture of a teal pumpkin in your window. Find more resources from Food Allergy Canada.

Explore our Halloween page for more tips: https://www.terrace.ca/halloween

Halloween Parties

This year, leave the parties behind. Indoor gatherings of any size put people at higher risk of getting COVID-19. The Province of BC has also put out an order stating that all households cannot have more than six people visit at one time. What can you do instead? The BC Centre for Disease Control suggests celebrating other Halloween traditions you can do with your household or small social group, like watching a favourite scary movie or playing spooky games.

If you DO host or attend a small gathering, be sure to follow the new public health order, sticking to six people at the most, and ensuring you know everyone who attends—no plus-ones. Don’t pass around snacks, drinks, or smokes of any kind. Try to be outside more than inside, and keep indoor spaces well ventilated.

Decorating? Avoid using props that can cause coughing, such as smoke machines. And remember to use caution when using hand sanitizer near open flames—it’s very flammable!

Read the PHO order on gatherins at private residences here.

To learn more, read the CDC's guidelines for safer celebrations.

Home > Halloween Safety in Terrace